Making forests pay in a warming world

By hampshirehouse December 13, 2010 katingan

Rezal Kusumaatmadja

Rezal Kusumaatmadja (JP/ Melinda Chickering)

Deep in the flooded jungles of southern Borneo, muddy peat oozes underfoot like jello, threatening to consume anyone who tries to walk even a few yards into the thick, steaming forest.

Hard to imagine this brown, gooey stuff could become a new global currency worth billions a year, much less an important tool in the fight against climate change.

Yet this is a new frontier for business, says Bali-based consultant Rezal Kusumaatmadja, and a new way to pay for conservation efforts in a world facing ever more pressure on the land to grow food and extract timber, coal and other resources.

Read full story at globeandmail.com


Be social, share this page with:


 
 Emily Readett-Bayley Twitter Emily Readett-Bayley on Pinterest Emily Readett-Bayley on Linkedin Emily Readett-Bayley on Google Plus Emily Readett-Bayley on houzz
ERB and Katingan on YouTube